Automobile Accident Attorney

Oklahoma Law Injury Blog


Three Injured in Oklahoma Crash, Alcohol Potentially Involved

Noble McIntyre on September 29, 2011

A recent accident has once again cast a spotlight on the prevalence of drunk driving related incidences in Oklahoma. On September 28, 2011, three men were taken to OU Medical Center after a man who may have been driving drunk caused a head-on collision. According to police, the accident occurred around 6 a.m. at NW 30th and North Council Road in Bethany. Reports say that a driver of a northbound gray sports utility vehicle crossed over the centerline on the road and hit a southbound red pick-up head on. Two men in the SUV were hurt and the man driving the pick-up suffered a severe leg injury. The driver faces a driving under the influence complaint.

Drunk driving is a serious problem that has been on the rise in Oklahoma. According to our Oklahoma Drunk Driving Statistics, alcohol-related accidents have risen steadily since 2005, even though fatalities have dropped significantly from 2008 to 2009. Continue reading


Distracted Drivers are the Most Dangerous

Noble McIntyre on July 1, 2011

Drunk drivers, move aside. Distracted drivers are now the most dangerous drivers on the road. According to recent distracted driving statistics, distracted drivers are 23 more times likely to cause accidents, compared to drunk drivers who are 7 times more likely to cause one. Also concerning is the amount of deaths that can be attributed to distracted driving. In 2009, out of the 33,808 car crash deaths, reports indicate that 16%, or 5,474, were attributable to driver distraction. Research also suggests that up to 80%, or 27,046 deaths, could have involved driver distraction.
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Practical Tips for Avoiding Oklahoma Trucking Accidents

Jeremy Thurman on February 17, 2011

Sometimes as attorneys we tend to focus on the after effects of an accident rather than accident prevention.  I’ve always believed that if one doesn’t learn from history then they are doomed to repeat.  That saying is even more applicable as it concerns highway safety. 

Any person with a driver’s license has encountered commercial carriers, also called tractor-trailers, eighteen-wheelers, semi-trucks and big-rigs on most roadways. Many of these behemoths can weigh up to 80,000 lbs (40 tons) and when towing only one trailer, they are over 80 ft long and are even longer when towing a double or triple trailer. Whatever term you prefer to call them, these big trucks are the mighty kings of the road and given their size and destructive potential, pose the greatest risk of serious injury on the roadways. 

Unfortunately, too many accidents involving passenger cars and semi trucks occur each year resulting in tens of thousands of injuries and death.   Our firm has handled numerous Oklahoma trucking accident cases and we consistently see the devastating impact these injuries have on the injured and their families.  Therefore, I want to share with you an article from Edmonds.com that describes the top five pet peeves truckers had with fellow motorists were. Please read this and remember these pet peeves when you encounter a semi on the roadway.  Here is his list:

 1) Riding in a trucker’s blind spots. Trucks have large blind spots to the right and rear of the vehicle. Smaller blind spots exist on the right front corner and mid-left side of the truck. The worst thing a driver can do is chug along in the trucker’s blind spot, where he cannot be seen. If you’re going to pass a truck, do it and get it over with. Don’t sit alongside with the cruise control set 1 mph faster than the truck is traveling.

2) Cut-offs. Don’t try to sneak into a small gap in traffic ahead of a truck. Don’t get in front of a truck and then brake to make a turn. Trucks take as much as three times the distance to stop as the average passenger car, and you’re only risking your own life by cutting a truck off and then slowing down in front of it.

3) Impatience while reversing. Motorists need to understand that it takes time and concentration to back a 48-foot trailer up without hitting anything. Sometimes a truck driver needs to make several attempts to reverse into tight quarters. Keep your cool and let the trucker do her job.

4) Don’t play policeman. Don’t try to make a truck driver conform to a bureaucrat’s idea of what is right and wrong on the highway. As an example, Taylor cited the way truck drivers handle hilly terrain on the highway. A fully loaded truck slows way down going up a hill. On the way down the other side of the hill, a fully loaded truck gathers speed quickly. Truckers like to use that speed to help the truck up the next hill. Do not sit in the passing lane going the speed limit. Let the truck driver pass, and let the Highway Patrol worry about citing the trucker for breaking the law.

5) No assistance in lane changes or merges. It’s not easy to get a 22-foot tractor and 48-foot trailer into traffic easily. If a trucker has his turn signal blinking, leave room for the truck to merge or change lanes. Indicate your willingness to allow the truck in by flashing your lights.


Deadly Car Accident – Adverse Driving Conditions

Jeremy Thurman on December 14, 2010

Chickashanews.com is reporting that a two people recently lost their lives in a car accident that occurred at 7:48 a.m. on State Highway 76 about two-tenths of a mile south of 260th. According to the Oklahoma Highway Patrol, a 2008 Suzuki Forenza was traveling northbound on SH 76 and impacted with a 2005 Dodge Ram pickup. The report states that it was a two lane undivided road. Investigators believe rainy and foggy conditions may have played a role in the accident. Our thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families.

This tragic car accident should serve as a reminder of the dangers associated with driving in rural Oklahoma. Having lived much of my life in rural Oklahoma, I can personally attest to the dangers associated with driving on undivided two lane roads. Oklahoma drivers should take extra care on these roads to be cognizant of other drivers as well as any adverse conditions that could cause a car wreck.


A Truly Scary Halloween Tale – Child and Driver Safety

Jeremy Thurman on October 28, 2010

From Charlie Brown’s Great Pumpkin to Ichabod Crane’s Headless Horseman there are endless frightful stories that are re-told each Halloween. However, there is one terrifying story about Halloween that is true.

On Halloween it is twice as likely children will be killed by a car while walking on this night than any other night of the year, according to study by Safe Kids USA. One big step that can be taken to prevent this is safe, cautious driving on the Halloween evening. The excitement of Halloween, crazy costumes and loads of candy can make children move in unpredictable ways. Therefore, it’s important to take extra precautions when driving on the ghostly holiday during the peak trick-or-treat hours of 5:30pm to 9:30pm. Continue reading


Automobile-deer collisions in Oklahoma not just a rural thing!

Jeremy Thurman on October 18, 2010

With the cooler weather approaching, Oklahomans would be aware of the real dangers of deer-automobile collisions. In 2009, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported 194 injury accidents involving deer and six of those accidents resulting in human fatalities. These figures are a drastic increase from the 2008 report of 86 injury accidents with two human fatalities.  One simple explanation for the rise in these types of accidents is that humans are moving more and more into deer habitat.  This encroachment forces deer to find new areas for food and water, which can push them to cross country roads to interstates.  Another explanation is the deer population overall is growing in the state of Oklahoma according to Oklahoma Game & Fish Magazine.  The fall season is more common for deer-auto collisions because it’s mating season for deer.  Additionally, the food sources for deer change in the autumn from grassy plains to wooded areas with nuts and hardier foliage.   Last but not least, hunting season in Oklahoma starts in October causing deer to move more frequently.

 How can you prepare yourself?

Some general knowledge about deer can help.  For example, deer are mainly active at dawn and dusk, and travel in numbers ranging from two deer on up to twenty.  Therefore, you should be on the look-out on the way to work or school in the mornings and late evenings.  Also be sure and scan not only the road, but the grassy areas on the side of the road.  Try to use your high-beam headlights as much as possible to enable you to see the deer and the deer to be alert to your presence.  Don’t rely solely on the deer whistles you may have mounted on your car, they are not 100% protection against a collision. 

Remember, you may not be able to avoid a collision with a deer because swerving your vehicle could be more dangerous.  For instance, you could swerve into on-coming traffic and cause a more serious collision with another vehicle.  Or on the other hand, you could lose control of your vehicle and cause greater damage to yourself than was necessary.  Deer are very unpredictable animals and there is no way to know which direction they will turn.  The best advice is to slow down when you see the animal on the side of the road.


What Every Car Wreck Victim Should Know

Jeremy Thurman on September 2, 2010

If you are an injury victim in an automobile accident, there are several important things to remember.  Several basic concepts can make all the difference if you, your family or friends are hurt and need help.  In this article, I will list the important things to do if you are hurt in a car wreck.

If any party involved in the accident is injured immediately call 911.  The first hour after a car accident is critical and can often mean the difference between life and death.

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