Catastrophic Injuries

Oklahoma Law Injury Blog


Virginia Bus Crash Kills 4, Injures 54

Noble McIntyre on June 1, 2011


Practical Tips for Avoiding Oklahoma Trucking Accidents

Jeremy Thurman on February 17, 2011

Sometimes as attorneys we tend to focus on the after effects of an accident rather than accident prevention.  I’ve always believed that if one doesn’t learn from history then they are doomed to repeat.  That saying is even more applicable as it concerns highway safety. 

Any person with a driver’s license has encountered commercial carriers, also called tractor-trailers, eighteen-wheelers, semi-trucks and big-rigs on most roadways. Many of these behemoths can weigh up to 80,000 lbs (40 tons) and when towing only one trailer, they are over 80 ft long and are even longer when towing a double or triple trailer. Whatever term you prefer to call them, these big trucks are the mighty kings of the road and given their size and destructive potential, pose the greatest risk of serious injury on the roadways. 

Unfortunately, too many accidents involving passenger cars and semi trucks occur each year resulting in tens of thousands of injuries and death.   Our firm has handled numerous Oklahoma trucking accident cases and we consistently see the devastating impact these injuries have on the injured and their families.  Therefore, I want to share with you an article from Edmonds.com that describes the top five pet peeves truckers had with fellow motorists were. Please read this and remember these pet peeves when you encounter a semi on the roadway.  Here is his list:

 1) Riding in a trucker’s blind spots. Trucks have large blind spots to the right and rear of the vehicle. Smaller blind spots exist on the right front corner and mid-left side of the truck. The worst thing a driver can do is chug along in the trucker’s blind spot, where he cannot be seen. If you’re going to pass a truck, do it and get it over with. Don’t sit alongside with the cruise control set 1 mph faster than the truck is traveling.

2) Cut-offs. Don’t try to sneak into a small gap in traffic ahead of a truck. Don’t get in front of a truck and then brake to make a turn. Trucks take as much as three times the distance to stop as the average passenger car, and you’re only risking your own life by cutting a truck off and then slowing down in front of it.

3) Impatience while reversing. Motorists need to understand that it takes time and concentration to back a 48-foot trailer up without hitting anything. Sometimes a truck driver needs to make several attempts to reverse into tight quarters. Keep your cool and let the trucker do her job.

4) Don’t play policeman. Don’t try to make a truck driver conform to a bureaucrat’s idea of what is right and wrong on the highway. As an example, Taylor cited the way truck drivers handle hilly terrain on the highway. A fully loaded truck slows way down going up a hill. On the way down the other side of the hill, a fully loaded truck gathers speed quickly. Truckers like to use that speed to help the truck up the next hill. Do not sit in the passing lane going the speed limit. Let the truck driver pass, and let the Highway Patrol worry about citing the trucker for breaking the law.

5) No assistance in lane changes or merges. It’s not easy to get a 22-foot tractor and 48-foot trailer into traffic easily. If a trucker has his turn signal blinking, leave room for the truck to merge or change lanes. Indicate your willingness to allow the truck in by flashing your lights.


Deadly Car Accident – Adverse Driving Conditions

Jeremy Thurman on December 14, 2010

Chickashanews.com is reporting that a two people recently lost their lives in a car accident that occurred at 7:48 a.m. on State Highway 76 about two-tenths of a mile south of 260th. According to the Oklahoma Highway Patrol, a 2008 Suzuki Forenza was traveling northbound on SH 76 and impacted with a 2005 Dodge Ram pickup. The report states that it was a two lane undivided road. Investigators believe rainy and foggy conditions may have played a role in the accident. Our thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families.

This tragic car accident should serve as a reminder of the dangers associated with driving in rural Oklahoma. Having lived much of my life in rural Oklahoma, I can personally attest to the dangers associated with driving on undivided two lane roads. Oklahoma drivers should take extra care on these roads to be cognizant of other drivers as well as any adverse conditions that could cause a car wreck.


North-Central Oklahoma: 7 Injured When Pick Up Truck Collided with School Bus

Savannah Dunn on November 10, 2010

According to the Associated Press, at least seven people, including five students, were hurt when a pickup truck collided with a school bus in the north-central Oklahoma town of Kildare.

The accident happened around 3:35 p.m Tuesday on Highway 77 near Kildare and Pecan roads just north of Ponca City. Troopers say the 1980 Chevy pickup truck driven by Arkansas City, Kan., resident Clifford Barney was traveling south on Pecan Road when it failed to yield at a stop sign and collided with the school bus. Continue reading


Major Oklahoma Fatality Accident of 2009 Due to Fatigued Driving

Elizabeth Larrick on

The road hazard of drowsy driving is normally hidden behind the obvious dangers of intoxication, speeding and texting; but, this concealed risk is experienced by 41% of drivers according to a report by American Automobile Association Foundation for Traffic Safety. Snoozing while driving is responsible for an estimated 1,550 deaths, 71,000 injuries, and 100,000 accidents each year. (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) These numbers are only collected by driver admissions and therefore hundreds more accidents and deaths may be caused by sleepy drivers. Continue reading


A Truly Scary Halloween Tale – Child and Driver Safety

Jeremy Thurman on October 28, 2010

From Charlie Brown’s Great Pumpkin to Ichabod Crane’s Headless Horseman there are endless frightful stories that are re-told each Halloween. However, there is one terrifying story about Halloween that is true.

On Halloween it is twice as likely children will be killed by a car while walking on this night than any other night of the year, according to study by Safe Kids USA. One big step that can be taken to prevent this is safe, cautious driving on the Halloween evening. The excitement of Halloween, crazy costumes and loads of candy can make children move in unpredictable ways. Therefore, it’s important to take extra precautions when driving on the ghostly holiday during the peak trick-or-treat hours of 5:30pm to 9:30pm. Continue reading


Unlicensed Driver Sends 5 Victims to the Hospital

Jeremy Thurman on September 21, 2010

Intoxicated driving continues to be a leading cause of catastrophic automobile accidents in Oklahoma.  A prime example of this can be found at KFOR.com  where they report that an unlicensed, speeding and to make matters worse intoxicated driver has sent give people to the hospital with two in critical condition. Continue reading


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